Posts Tagged ‘Unsolved Murder’


The boy in the box

Boxboy

In 1957, an unidentified Caucasian male, probable age 4 to 6 years, whose nude body, wrapped in a cheap flannel blanket, was found lying face up inside a large cardboard carton just a few feet from the edge of Susquehanna Road in Northeast Philadelphia. The body was dry and clean. The boy’s arms were carefully folded across his stomach. The finger and toenails had been recently trimmed short and neat. His hair had been cut recently – very close to the head, in a crude, hurried way, perhaps as a deliberate attempt to conceal the child’s identity. Small clumps of cut hair clung to his entire body, suggesting that someone had groomed him while he was unclothed, probably either shortly before or immediately after death. There were many bruises all over the child’s body; particularly on the head and face. All of the bruises appeared to have been inflicted at the same time. Despite recent DNA investigations in to the crime, it remains unsolved.

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The Axe man of New Orleans

1196750-French Quarter New Orleans-New Orleans

On May 23, 1918, an Italian grocer named Joseph Maggio and his wife were butchered while sleeping in their apartment above the Maggio grocery store. Upon investigation, the police discovered that a panel in the rear door had been chiseled out, providing a way in for the killer. The murder weapon, an axe, was found in the apartment, still coated with the Maggio’s blood. Nothing in the house had been stolen, including jewelry and money that were nearly in plain sight. The only clue that was discovered was a message that had been written in chalk near the victim’s home. It read: “Mrs. Joseph Maggio will sit up tonight. Just write Mrs. Toney”. Almost exactly a month after the Maggio murder came a second crime. Louis Bossumer, a grocer who lived behind his store with his common-law wife, Annie Harriet Lowe, was discovered by neighbors one morning, lying in a pool of blood. The Axeman murdered a total of eight people before the killings stopped. There was no evidence to link the only suspect, Joseph Mumfre, to the crimes.

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Jack the Ripper

Jacktheripper3-1

Traditionally, Jack the Ripper is considered to have killed five women, all London prostitutes, during 1888. The Ripper generally killed by strangling his victims, then laying them down and cutting the arteries in their throats; this was followed by a varied process of mutilation, during which parts of the body were removed and kept. During the autumn and winter of 1888/89 a number of letters circulated among the police and newspapers, all claiming to be from the Whitechapel murderer; these include the ‘From Hell’ letter and one accompanied by part of a kidney. Ripperologists consider most, if not all, of the letters to be hoaxes. Over a century later Jack’s identity has never been wholly proven (there isn’t even a leading suspect), most aspects of the case are still debated and the Ripper is an infamous cultural bogeyman.

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Jack the Stripper

Hammersmith-Bridge

Jack the Stripper was the nickname given to an unknown serial killer responsible for what came to be known as the London “nude murders” between 1964 and 1965. His victimology was similar to Jack the Ripper’s. He murdered six — possibly eight — prostitutes, whose nude bodies were discovered around London or dumped in the River Thames. The victim count is ambiguous because two of the murders attributed to him did not fit his modus operandi. Like the Jack the Ripper killings, the Stripper’s reign of terror seemed to cease on its own, and there were few solid clues for police to investigate. Though his identity remains unknown, crime writer Donald Rumbelow notes that the killer could have been a young man who committed suicide in south London. This main suspect, who was also a favorite suspect of Chief Superintendent Du Rose, was a security guard on the Heron Trading Estate in Acton whose rounds included a paint shop where one of the bodies was thought to have been hidden after the crime. Though there was never any hard evidence to link him to the crimes, his family found his suicide inexplicable, and his suicide note cryptically said only that he was “unable to take the strain any longer”.

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Black Dahlia

Short

Elizabeth Short (born 29 July 1924) was a 22-year-old American woman who was the victim of a gruesome and much-publicized murder. Nicknamed the Black Dahlia, Short was found cut in half and severely mutilated on 15 January 1947 in Leimert Park, Los Angeles. The murder, which has remained unsolved, has been the source of widespread speculation as well as several books and film adaptations. Sensational and sometimes inaccurate press coverage, as well as the horrible nature of the crime, focused intense public attention on the case. About 60 people confessed to the murder, mostly men, as well as a few women. As the case continues to command public attention, many more people have been proposed as Short’s killer, much like London’s Jack the Ripper murders of 1888.

Source of post content: Listverse.com

Cold case: Donna Willing was sent to the store to fetch bread when she was killed

Pictured: Donna Willing was nine years old in 1970 when she was raped and murdered after being sent to the store to pick-up bread in a Wisconsin town

11/18/12 MILWAUKEE, WI — Virginia Davis describes says the pain left behind by her 9-year-old sister’s 1970 rape and strangulation as being like “a million holes.”

Only 4 years old at the time, Davis knew little about the crime. The subject remained off-limits for the next four decades for many in a family that hoped to forget the hurt. But Davis couldn’t forget, and after years seeking help to solve her sister’s killing, she’s preparing to face the man police believe is responsible.

On Monday, prosecutors will argue that a childhood neighbor and convicted sex offender – who they say confessed to the killing but has since recanted – should go to trial in the death of Donna Willing. With physical evidence in the case lost or destroyed, prosecutors say the will argue under the state’s sex offender law that Robert Hill, 73, is a sexually violent person and must remain in custody indefinitely.

Davis says that when she was a child, her sisters would scold her for talking about Donna, warning, “You don’t want to make mom cry, do you?” Most of the siblings don’t discuss it even now.

Horror: Donna Willing was just blocks from home when she was raped and murdered in 1970

Pictured above: Donna shortly before her murder, stands in-front of her home with a hula-hoop around her

Unsolved: Virginia Davis, right, has spent her life helping to track down the man who strangled her sister, center

UNSOLVED: Virginia Davis, right, has spent her life helping to track down the man who strangled her sister, center

But Davis needed answers. At 15 she found the courage to go to the library and read news coverage about her sister’s death. Every detail discovered since has helped.

“I didn’t feel like so lonely, I didn’t feel so empty, I didn’t feel like I had a million holes anymore,” said Davis, now a mother of three who lives in suburban Milwaukee. “I just started feeling like it’s easier, it’s easier, it’s easier now. I can talk about her now. I can speak her name.”

Davis clearly remembers the afternoon of Feb. 26, 1970. Her big sister Donna was reading to her from a favorite book about animals as they sat on the couch. Her mother wanted Donna to go to the bakery for bread, but Virginia purposely delayed the trip, begging for one more story.

“I remember seeing out the window, it was getting dark and thinking `Mom won’t make her go if it gets dark. She’ll send (my brother) or somebody else. She can’t go,’” Davis recalls. “We were afraid of the boogeyman and stuff back then. The boogeyman will get her if she goes out after dark.”

Donna walked out at 5:15 p.m. A witness later saw her get into a green car. Less than two hours later, a man discovered her bruised and bloodied body under a car in his garage about a mile away.

Newspaper reports at the time said police had people of interest, but no leads panned out.

In 2004, Virginia Davis saw a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel story about police arresting an 83-year-old man for a 1958 murder based on DNA evidence. She called the reporter for help getting police to take another look at her sister’s case.

A cold case unit that formed in 2007 did, and soon focused on Hill. He had lived next door with his wife and five children and Davis said she remembered playing with his son. She also remembered his wife, who always yelled, but not him.

Prosecutors soon discovered physical evidence in Donna Willing’s case had been lost during a flood or when detectives cleaned out the evidence room in the 1990s, according to police Lt. Keith Balash. So investigators in 2008 began interviewing Hill in prison – where he was serving a 10-year sentence for sexually assaulting four children under the age of 10 between 1995 and 2002.

Hill first told police he sexually assaulted Donna after she got into his car that night, according to court documents. She began to squirm and slapped him. He became angry, afraid she would tell on him. He strangled her and dumped her in a garage. It all took about 10 minutes, he said.

In another account outlined in court documents, Hill said he molested Donna for years, picked her up and had sex with her. After she screamed, he put his hand over her mouth and strangled her.

Hill, who is now being in held a supervised facility, has since recanted both statements. Balash said Hill knew specifics of Donna’s injuries that hadn’t been released.

Hill’s attorney, Robert Prifogle, didn’t return a phone call seeking comment before Monday’s hearing.

Before her mother died in 2009, Davis finally asked why she needed Donna to go to the bakery. Her mother said she wanted to make French toast for dinner. That filled a big hole. This year, Davis met the man who discovered his sister’s body – another big hole filled. She said she had blamed herself when she was younger for delaying her sister’s trip until after dark, but no more.

Davis chokes up when talking about her gratitude for the cold case detectives who pursued the case.

“I want to invent or create a word and I can’t come up with anything yet that is the equivalent to how I feel,” she said.

Source: Huffingtonpost

Do you know these young woman?

These photographs were discovered in the Summer of 1969 in an abandoned hanger located in Berks County, PA. The hanger was a hot-spot for a local motorcycle gang at the time. The female’s in the photo were never identified nor has anyone ever claimed to know them. There was also no missing person reports in the local community and it is believed that the two were not from the area.
Authorities have received information indicating that these photos could be instrumental in identifying  both Jane Does.

 

Jane Doe Number One (Left)

Discovered On August 22, 1968 In A Wooded Area Along State Route 82, Caernarvon Twp, Berks County, Near The Chester/Berks County Line.
Estimated Date Of Death: August 14, 1968
Cause Of Death: Multiple Gunshot Wounds – 5 Shots To The Chest And Abdomen, One To The Left Temple.
Estimated Age: Initial Estimate Was That She Was 15-20 Years Old, However, When Doctors Examined Calcium Formations In The Bone Joints, It Was Decided That She May Have Been As Old As 30.
 
Approximate Height & Weight: 5’3″, 125-130 Lbs
Distinguishing Characteristics: Brunette Hair With A Reddish Tint.  Eye Color Unknown.  No Scars Or Tattoos.
Clothing: Black Nehru-Type Blouse With Zipper Down The Back;  Black Bra, Size 36B;  Sandy Colored Nylon Stockings; White Girdle; Nico Brand White Sandals, Size 8M, Made In Italy.  No Slacks Or Skirt Found.
Jewelry: Bronze, Four-Way, Religious Medal On A Heavy, Endless Chain.  The Medal Depicted The Crucifix On The Front.  On The Back Was The Inscription: “I Am A Catholic.  In Case Of Emergency, Call Me A Priest”.  She Was Also Wearing A Sterling Identification-Type Bracelet With A Flexible Band On Her Left Wrist.  There Was No Inscription On The ID Bracelet. 
Other: 22-Caliber Short Bullets Were Removed From The Body.  Extensive Facial Decomposition.
Agency Case Number: L01-0026607
NCIC Number: U-294925792

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Jane Doe Number Two (Right)  

Was Located On April 18, 1969 In French Creek State Park Which Is About 3-1/2 Miles From Where Jane Doe Number One Was Discovered. She Was Deceased And Her Skeletal Remains Were On A Large Flat Rock And Scattered Within A 12-Foot Radius With No Attempt To Conceal Or Hide Her. She Was Missing Three Teeth And Was Wearing No Clothes But One Sandal And A Pair Of Underwear Was Next To The Victim. The Elastic Part Of The Underwear Was Rolled Up, As If It Had Been Rolled Off Of The Victim.
DNA And Fingerprints Are Not Available.
It Is Unclear If Victim Number Two Lost 3 Of Her Teeth Due To A Struggle, Or If They Were Missing Prior To Her Death.
She Is Described As Having Brunette Colored Hair, Standing 5’1” Tall, With An Estimated Age Of 21 Years.
Estimated Time Of Death: Summer 1968
NCIC Number: U-294927902  Agency Case Number: L01-0033856

Photo of the victim’s sandals, the pair of sandals on the left belonged to victim number one and the sandal on the right belonged to victim number two, the other sandal belonging to victim number two were never located

The bracelet and bronze medal belonged to victim number one. On the medal was the description: I am a Catholic in-case of an emergency, call me a priest

 

If you have any information regarding this cold case you’re asked to please contact: Pennsylvania State Police 610-378-4035

You may also leave a online tip by emailing – contact@pennsylvaniamissing.com
Those who choose to leave a tip can remain anonymous

A family in ruins: Chilling mystery as brother is accused of killing his identical twin

  • Wasel Ali, 19, found strangled prosecutors said hours after fight with his brother in 2007
  • His identical twin brother Wael was charged in his murder four years later
  • As twins sharing the same DNA no DNA evidence was found at the scene with no other murder weapon besides hands used that could provide finger prints
  • Wael, now 24, was freed in April of this year after a mistrial
  • Wasel’s murder remains unsolved

Slain: More than four years after the murder of 19-year-old Wasel Ali, his identical twin brother Wael, both pictured together, has been released on a charge of first-degree murder

Slain: More than four years after the murder of 19-year-old Wasel Ali, his identical twin brother Wael, both pictured together, has been released on a charge of first-degree murder

 

Everything together: With the brother's high school graduation they both enrolled in the Army hoping to go into a career as military police officers
Everything together: With the brother's high school graduation they both enrolled in the Army hoping to go into a career as military police officers
Everything together: With the brother’s high school graduation they both enrolled in the Army hoping to go into a career as military police officers

Click link for full article by Dailymail.co.uk
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2231032/Wael-Wasel-Ali-The-chilling-cold-case-trial-mystery-brother-accused-killing-identical-twin.html#ixzz2BwqX9dOf 
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LAS CRUCES, NEW MEXICO — On February 10, 1990, at the local bowling alley in Las Cruces, New Mexico, Ida the cook, was in the kitchen preparing for the lunch hour rush. It was about 8:00 A.M. and just an hour before opening time. The day manager, Stephanie, was in the office adding up the previous night’s receipts. Stephanie’s 12-year-old daughter, Melissa, and Melissa’s friend, Amy, were with her.

At about 8:20, Ida was surprised in the kitchen by a stranger with a pistol. He forced her towards the office where Stephanie and the girls were being held by a second gunman. According to Ida:

“I just thought they were gonna get money and then take off, especially when they told us, ‘All of you put your heads down.’”

The second gunman took $4,000 from the safe while the other gunman continued to yell, “Heads down!” Ida said she followed the instructions:

“When he said that, I thought, ‘These guys are leaving.’ And that’s when I felt they had shot me in the head.”

Seconds later, employee Steven Teran arrived at the bowling alley with his two young children. Like the other witnesses, they were shot in the head. All three died, along with Melissa’s friend, Amy. Somehow, Stephanie, Melissa and Ida survived the vicious attack. Captain Fred Rubio of the Las Cruces Police Department:

“We assessed the scene immediately. We canvassed the neighborhood, and thank god we were able to come up with a couple of witnesses that were able to give us some pretty decent composites.”

One of the witnesses was Stephanie’s brother, who we’ll call Michael. He said he had stopped by the bowling alley on his way to school:

“I saw two Hispanic gentlemen walking from the back of the building towards the front. The older gentleman handed the younger gentleman a small case. The older gentleman squats down, and looks right at me as I’m driving towards them. I took notice of what they were wearing, and their descriptions, hair color, skin, eyes.”

Based on this and all the eyewitness descriptions, police were able to draw up composites of the killers.

Both suspect’s were black adult males, one of the suspects spoke excellent English, no spanish while the other suspect spoke with a slight Spanish accent. For additional details please click the source below. Also, to view a composite sketch of both Suspect’s and to write a tip in (all tips can remain anonymous.) Click the source below.

Source: Unsolved

Pictured; Photo of murdered victim

New Bedford, MA (New England) — On May 30, 1985 the deceased body of John Moura, a 42-year-old taxi driver from New Bedford, was found hunched over the wheel of his taxi-cab at Fort Rodman in New Bedford, MA. He had been shot more then once from the back. His jewelry and wallet, which contained money was laying right next to his body, crossing out robbery as a motive. His taxi-cab and meter were still running.

Police have been looking for a person-of-interest for decades. During one of his taxi-runs, Moura had picked up a unidentified man in-front of ‘Bank of Boston’ on Pleasant Street in New Bedford around 11a.m. the morning of his death. By noon-time, Moura would not respond to radio contact to the cab company he worked for. A couple hours after the 11a.m. pick-up of the unidentified man, his body was found.

Artist Sketch of unidentified person-of-interest (description below)

The person of interest is described as a Caucasian male with dark/black hair that was neatly-groomed, he was around 5’7,” weighing approximately 170 pounds with a slight gut and medium build. The unknown man was last see wearing a black t-shirt, black pants and is believed to have been carrying a black or tan jacket.

Moura mother has since died without answers of her sons untimely death. He has left behind five children who are still searching for answers.

There isn’t much information found on this murder case and most people have never heard of it. In-fact, aside from this article, the only one that comes up on a search engine is CTCOLDCASES which is the source of the information posted. Regardless of how long this case has been cold, it still needs justice!

If you have any information regarding this cold-case, please contact: New Bedford Police Department at 508-991-6300 extension 327. (all tips are anonymous. You can also contact the NBPD by mail or going to their website.)

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	Members of the musical group RUN-DMC (L to R) Jason Mizell (Jam Master Jay), Darryl McDaniels (DMC) and Joseph Simmons (DJ Run) pose for photographs after being inducted into Hollywood’s Rockwalk on February 25, 2002 in Los Angeles, California. Hollywood’s Rockwalk is a sidewalk gallery dedicated to honoring artists who have made a significant contribution to the evolution of rock ‘n roll. REUTERS/Adrees Latif<br />
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Pictured;  Left, Jason (Jam Master Jay) Mizell, Darryl (DMC) McDaniels and Joseph (Run) Simmons of hip-hop super group Run-DMC. The rappers from Hollis, Queens, are reuniting for a concert tour without Mizell who was murdered in 2002. The case remains unsolved.

10/23/12 (Article written and published by NYDailyNews)  — Murder Of Jason Mizell A.k.a Jam Master Of Run DMC Remains Unsolved Ten Years Later:

Hip-hop pioneers Run-DMC are back on tour — their first without the backbeat of the group, DJ Jam Master Jay, the victim of an unsolved slaying shrouded in mystery and lack of cooperation by witnesses.

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	Rapper Jam Master Jay was shot and killed in recording studio at 90-10 Merrick blvd. body of rapper is taken from building<br />
” src=”<a href=http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1189861.1350960514!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_200/jay22n-7-web.jpg&#8221; />

Pictured; Body of rapper Jason (Jam Master Jay) Mizell is removed from Merrick Blvd. recording studio after Oct. 30, 2002, murder.

The platinum-selling band — which brought hip-hop to the mainstream with hits like “It’s Tricky,” “King of Rock” and a remake of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way” — kicked off a tour last month even as the NYPD remains frustrated the 2002 execution-style rubout of the hip-hop star, whose real name was Jason Mizell, remains stalled 10 years later.

RELATED: Owners of Jamaica’s Hall of Fame Music store, which opened in space where Jam Master Jay of RUN-DMC was fatally shot, beathe new life into space

“We never really had a good lead,” the case’s head detective, Vincent Santangelo, told the Daily News. “Nobody would or nobody could tell us the who or what. We’re still looking for that person.”

Law enforcement sources, who at one time worked the case, said the people inside Mizell’s 24/7 recording studio provided a play-by-play account of the Oct. 30, 2002 murder — but everyone stopped short in identifying the gunman or his sidekick.

The 37-year-old turntable wizard — who stayed anchored near the hardscrabble Hollis neighborhood where he grew up — arrived at the studio just hours before the killing.

After packing some equipment for a show in Philadelphia the next day, Mizell got a bite to eat and took a seat on a couch at the rear of the studio. His pal, Uriel (Tony) Rincon, sat next to him and the pair began playing a video game.

Mizell placed a .45-caliber pistol on the arm rest.

A short time later, Mizell’s assistant, Lydia High, entered the cramped studio to go over his itinerary. High’s brother, Randy Allen – Mizell’s longtime pal and business partner – soon came in with two friends, but they shut themselves in the control room at the front of the studio.

Everyone had been in the room for less than an hour when a man dressed in black, possibly wearing a hat, stepped in and gave Mizell a hug about 7:30 p.m. But after the short embrace, the man pulled out a .40-caliber handgun.

“Oh, s—-,” was all a witness heard Mizell say before a shot rang out.

The bullet pierced Rincon’s left leg. Then, a second shot hit Mizell in the head, killing him before he hit the floor.

The killer and his accomplice, who was standing outside the door, both sprinted out of the two-story building and disappeared.

Santangelo, a 22-year vet, and his team spent years chasing scores of leads that sometimes brought him to cities across the country. No arrests have been made, but Santangelo believes that could change with the help of a good tipster — who can collect a $60,000 reward if there’s a conviction.

But the sources, who spoke to the News last week, said they’ve already fingered one of Mizell’s killers, but making an arrest been hampered by reluctant witnesses and bad press.

“We just never had enough to make it stick,” said one of the sources.

Investigators suspect career criminal Ronald Washington was either the lookout or the gunman. The hit was likely ordered after Mizell — who owed up to $500,000 to the IRS — refused to settle a decade-old drug debt with his old friend Curtis Scoon, the sources said.

Washington — who is serving a 17-year stint for armed robbery — allegedly confessed his role in the killing to a former girlfriend, authorities have said.

“She was credible. She was a witness who we vetted,” said one source. “We had enough to bring it to a judge.”

High, who allegedly buzzed the killers into Mizell’s studio, said Washington was one of the killers, but she later recanted.

“She (also) changed her story three or four times after,” another source said.

Neither Washington nor Scoon, who now lives in Georgia, was ever charged.

“As time goes by, he becomes less and less of a suspect,” said Scoon’s lawyer, Marvyn Kornberg. “He’s moved on with his life.”

The open case has left Mizell’s family shattered.

“The past 10 years has been really hard,” said the jam master’s brother, Marvin Thompson, 57. “There’s still so many unanswered questions. … I pray that someone will step up and close this case and give us some peace.”

Thompson, too, is convinced that Washington was one of Mizell’s killers.

“It’s frustrating,” he said. “But the fact that he’s in jail … I guess that’s some kind of closure.”

Mizell’s 77-year-old mother, Connie Mizell-Perry, said she believes karma will eventually sneak up on the wanted men.

Speaking from her North Carolina home, she had one thing to say to the killers: “One of these days, you’re going to think you have it made and someone is going to tap you on the shoulder and say, ‘Gotcha!’”

For now, though, the focus is on Run DMC, the revived hip-hop trio, now a duo with no turntables behind their microphones. Partners Darryl (DMC) McDaniels and Joe (Run) Simmons soldier on.

“I can’t believe it’s been 10 years since Jay’s death,” McDaniels said in a statement to the Daily News. “That’s crazy. It seems like I just saw him yesterday.

“He impacted other people’s lives and that’s the Jay I loved and respected,” McDaniels added. “But spiritually, he’s always with me. His presence is felt as strongly today as it was the night he passed away.”

Source: NYDailyNews

Milan Police placed the banner with the picture of Crandall and Lily on the vacant lot at 325 W. 4th Ave., where her home once stood. The family, Milan Police Department and Quad-City Crime Stoppers are continuing to raise awareness of Crandall’s cruel murder which remains unsolved years later.

Quad City, Illinois — Harriet Crandall was 96-years-old and although she was getting weaker physically, she showed no signs of slowing down. A recent great-grandma to her granddaughter name Lily, she loved spending time with her and always wanted to hold her but didn’t think she had the strength to do it, so with the help of a pillow for her arm, she was able to hold Lily, James Crandall, the father of Lily and son of Harriet said.. It was definitely a precious moment and James didn’t hesitate to snap a photo.

 

“She was tickled having her there,” James said of the photo, which was taken in the fall of 2007.

But on the night of August 30, 2008 less than one year after that photo was snapped, Harriet was at her Milan home on 325 W. 4th Ave when a house-fire broke out and sadly, she didn’t make it. At first glance, it was thought to be just an terrible accident but when the autopsy report came in so did the truth. Harriet Crandall was dead prior to the fire. She had been strangled by an unidentified killer and the fire was just a cover-up. But who would want to harm such a defenceless woman?

Earl Higgins was Crandall’s neighbor for 10 years.

“I shot the breeze with her. It’s hard to believe,” he said about her death.

Higgins said he was home when his daughter woke him up about 11:30 p.m. Aug. 30, 2008, after seeing the Crandall house on fire.

Firefighters were called to the scene shortly before 11 p.m. They found Crandall’s body on the floor of her bedroom. She was pronounced dead at the scene at 11:44 p.m.

Harriet Crandall lived in the house for 71 years and raised her two sons there, said James Crandall of Sherrard, Ill., her oldest. She lived there alone since her husband died in 1986.

After her death, James Crandall tried to salvage from the burned debris the furniture his father had built.

“I couldn’t get the smoke smell out of the wood,” he said. “I finally set fire to it and finished it.”

His younger brother, Kenneth Crandall of Alexis, Ill., said coping with his mother’s death after a few years is “getting easier as time goes by. It still hurts.”

John Zelnio, president of Quad-City Crime Stoppers, pointed out that Harriet Crandall’s 100th birthday would have been today.

“Any minute, some good tip could come in,” Zelnio said.

Beckwith said that even though his investigators are currently not working any leads on the case, he’s still confident it can be solved.

“A lot of people saw and heard things,” Beckwith said. “What we need is information that will put us in the path of finding the person responsible.”

If you have any information regarding this unsolved murder please contact: Quad-City Crime Stoppers at (309) 762-9500 and Milan police at (309) 787-8520.

Harriets obituary:

Harriet Crandall, 96, of Milan, passed away Saturday, Aug. 30, 2008, at her home.

Graveside services will be 11 a.m. Thursday at Chippiannock Cemetery, Rock Island. Those wishing to attend may meet at Wheelan-Pressly Funeral Home, Milan, at 10:30 a.m. Memorials may be made to American Cancer Society.

Harriet was born April 6, 1912, in Beaman, Iowa the daughter of Harry and Bertha Esbolt Hawley. She married Harold Crandall on Dec. 3, 1933, in Rock Island. He preceded her in death on June 11, 1986.

Harriet was a stay-at-home mom. She was a good mother who lived for her family. She enjoyed traveling with her husband.

Survivors include her sons and daughters-in-law, James and Velma Crandall, Sherrard, Kenneth and Ann Crandall, Alexis; six grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren. Harriet was preceded in death by her brother, Glen.

There is a $3,000 reward for anyone with any information leading to the arrest and conviction of the indivigual who murdered this woman.

By gum! Man arrested for 1976 cold case murder thanks to DNA evidence collected by cops in phony CHEWING GUM survey

  • Gary Raub, 63, was arrested yesterday in  Seattle in the brutal slaying of Blanche Kimball 36 years ago
  • 70-year-old was stabbed almost 50 times in  her home in Augusta, Maine
  • Police obtained the suspect’s DNA in July  after he agreed to participate in a fake chewing gum survey
  • Saliva matched DNA from blood splatted on  the woman’s kitchen cupboard
  • The murder happened on June 12,1976 and has been unsolved for over thirty-six-years
  • The victim was murdered on Memorial Day in 1976.
  • This case is the oldest unsolved murder in Maine that has been solved.

In custody: Gary Raub, pictured, has been arrested on Monday after for the 1976 stabbing death of a 70-year-old woman after DNA linked him to the crime

In custody: Gary Raub, pictured, has been arrested on Monday for the 1976  stabbing death of a 70-year-old woman after DNA obtained from chewing gum,  right, linked him to the crime

Click the link above for full story.

karina_holmerKarina Holmer, 20, was a Swedish AuPair who left her home country of Sweden and travelled to America to live with a Boston, Massachusetts family.

An AuPair is a childcare provider who receives a temporary visa to travel to another country and live with a family and care for their children in exchange for a predetermined wage and cultural experience. Karina was excited at the opportunity to travel to the US. Four months into the exchange and she was adapting very well. Her AuPair family described her as a responsible, respectable, trustworthy and caring woman who took her job her job taking care of children seriously, but also enjoyed her free time and exploring different places in New England. Just a young woman figuring her life out and having fun on the way. She had no enemies, at least none that were known.

The weekends were her time to go out and enjoy herself, exploring new clubs and bars, hanging out with friends, and meeting new people, and June 21, 1996 was no different.

On the night of June 21st she decided to go to Zanzibar, a popular nightclub on Boylston Place in Boston. She had been there before and was familiar with the scenery. She dressed to the nines, dotting a shining gray sweater and silver pants, which was the style then, and she was very stylish. Many described her as a very attractive woman and she had many males approaching her. She was always kind even if the attraction wasn’t mutual, and was far from stuck up.

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Outdated photo of Karina dressed in all black at Zanzibar prior to June 21, 1996

When she arrived at the club she was seen enjoying herself, drinking, dancing, socializing and even singing. She didn’t have a care in the world. Shortly after however, she was seen passed out on the clubs restroom floor. It appeared that she had gotten a little to intoxicated and like many people, being intoxicated more than likely lowered her guard and judgement and gave a sexual predator and murderer the opportunity to take advantage.

Details after the restroom incident are foggy and something only a few people, including her killer, no. What we do no is that the former Au-Pair was attacked, either by a stranger or someone she met that night or possibly someone she had met over the past four months in the United States, although unlikely given the circumstances.

Karina was not only murdered, she was tortured, sexually assaulted and dismembered into two pieces. The top half of her body was discarded in a Fenway dumpster but the bottom half of her body was never recovered.

Police searched high and low for the person(s) responsible. They tracked Karina’s movements in the 48 hours leading up to her death, interviewed dozens of individuals, and followed hundreds of tips. But despite the hard efforts her case remains unsolved and her killer’s identity remains unknown.

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The below article was published by The Phoenix , a Boston news website. It gives the account of Karina’s murder by a man who was one of the last people to have been Karina Holmer alive:

karina-holmerTHE CASE:

It’s been 15 years since the top half of Holmer’s body was discovered in a Fenway dumpster. The crime fascinated Boston, paralyzed its nightlife, and spurred an investigation that sputtered along for years. But the police never caught her killer.

They never even found the rest of her body.

I didn’t know Holmer by name, but I knew her face. I had said hello to her time after time when she’d come in to Zanzibar on weekend nights to drink; she got served, even though she was only 20. She was known as “Swedish Nanny.” They all were. There were a bunch of them, European au pairs, and they liked to party. They’d dance, they’d drink, and if they were lucky they’d end up getting finger-banged in the back stairwell during one of DJ Tad Bonvie’s cheese-heavy medleys.

We really should have seen this coming.

Monday morning rolled around, and I headed in for my day shift at the Zanzibar offices. The first thing I saw was the news crews blocking up the street. Big microphones bounced off my face as I made my way through the pack.

When I got up to Zanzibar, the tiny office was bursting with cops, both uniformed officers and detectives in plain clothes. Sit down, I was told, they’ll get to you soon enough.

Finally, the cops crowded me into one of the manager’s offices. Did you see anyone suspicious on Friday night, or any other night? they demanded, as I slouched behind the big desk in the poorly lit room. Where were you at the time of the murder?

I was a grubby-looking guy those days, I won’t lie. Plus, a friend at Allston Beat used to give me bottles of Hard Candy nail polish, and I had each fingernail painted a different color. I must have looked suspicious. When they finished asking questions, they started over again.

They questioned my Alley coworkers, too. Cheryl Hanson, who ran Bishop’s Pub across the alley, told them she’d talked to Holmer the night she died. “It’s kind of freaky to think I was just complimenting her on her clothes,” she remembers, “and now I’m giving a description of them so they can help identify her murdered body.”

My buddy Thomas was questioned after the cops found out he’d been shot one night outside Zanzibar months before. “I had to get all my credit-card receipts from that weekend and put them in chronological order to give to them,” he told me years later. “After that, I never heard another word from them.”

The cops called me in for questioning again and again. It got ridiculous. I think I finally told them that I was a coke-head and too weak to even lift up a chainsaw.

A young woman with dirty-blonde hair was passed out along the left wall, teetering on a tall chair with her head buried in her hands. I thought nothing of it as I glided by. This wasn’t anything new, you see. It wouldn’t have been a Friday night without at least one zonked-out babe hanging out in Zanzibar just after closing time looking for her friends or a one night stand.

This was the ’90s, after all — a time when Zima was king, the cocaine was crap, and gazillionaire princes from God-knows-where guzzled Cristal amid the sweaty Euro crowd scene. And on the weekends, they all packed into Zanzibar, the Theater District club where I worked, the sweaty beating heart of a bar-lined alley known as “the Alley.”

From the balcony above, one of the bartenders called down to me. “Fayner!” he yelled. “Can you walk that chick to a cab or something?”

I pointed to the woman I had just passed. “This chick?”

He replied yes.

“No problem, just let me grab something from the back first,” I said, as I made my way to the cooler to rifle beer. But when I came back, she was gone.

So I guess you could say that I was one of the last people to see Karina Holmer alive.

PERSON OF INTEREST

Eyewitnesses recalled many contradicting things that morning. Holmer left Zanzibar alone and got into a cab. She took off on foot with an older man. She got into a silver car with four dudes and sped off. She chatted with a crazy man and his big shaggy dog in matching Superman T-shirts. But who’s to say the woman any of those people saw was in fact Karina Holmer? Drunken chicks wearing shiny silver pants spewed out of the Alley every night of the week in those days.

Amid the confusion, suspects emerged. The first and most obvious was Frank Rapp, a Dover artist and Holmer’s boss; a mysterious fire had burned outside Rapp’s condo complex after Holmer went missing. But the police couldn’t find anything linking him to the crime.

After that, the investigation sprawled out in a dozen different directions. Detectives questioned a panhandler, Juan Polo, who was seen singing and dancing in the street with Holmer the night of her murder. They also questioned Sleep Chamber frontman and noted junkie John Zewizz, who happened to live two blocks from the dumpster where Holmer was found. And they investigated Herbie Witten, the crazy guy with the dog in the Superman T-shirt.

But no one was ever arrested.

When I tried to talk to the cops for this story, all I got back was this boilerplate e-mail: “The Boston Police Homicide Unit continues to seek justice for Karina Holmer. Investigators share a strong desire with Karina’s family to hold the perpetrator accountable. If anyone has any information about what happened to Karina, please contact 617.343.4470. Detectives will continue to aggressively pursue any new leads.”

The theory that had the most traction with those of us who worked down at the Alley was that a cop who had dated Holmer was the real killer. But the most that ever came of that was a terse Boston Globe story, noting that an unnamed officer had been questioned in connection with the murder.

“No one’s a suspect, but everyone’s a suspect,” a “source close to the investigation” told the Globe.

PARTY’S OVER

The Alley became a ghost town after that.

At Zanzibar, it felt as if the place was cursed. Night after night, the club was empty. The manager would send staff home. Everyone started looking for new jobs elsewhere. No one wanted to go down with the ship.

“Everyone was on this heightened alert,” recalls Hanson, “making sure underage people were kept away; definitely being more diligent with IDs. Basically, we stopped making money.”

Outside our doors, there was something heavy in the air. Before, at closing time, the Alley would be packed with people — screaming, yelling, making out, and puking. But after the murder, it was quiet. People walked to cars or to the T in pairs or groups. Women were careful who they talked to.

In October, the city suspended Zanzibar’s license for serving underage drinkers. By the following year, the club was reopened with a new name, new management, and a mostly-new staff, and soon business was blazing again. But that crowd — the Euro kids and the nannies and the yuppies — never really came back (probably for the best).

Karina Holmer’s killer is still out there. It’s hard not to wonder about.

“Yeah, I still think about her death every once in a while,” Hanson says. “Every time I’m near Lansdowne Street and I pass that dumpster, I wonder what happened that weekend.”