Archive for January, 2013

Two suspects still wanted for the armed robbery of a store in Union, New Jersey during the Summer.

quick_check_robbery

They were described as being two black males, believed to be in their late teens, both with a thin (med) build, standing approximately 6`0″ tall. If the still-shots are two small for viewing then please click here to view a larger set.

In the early morning hours of July 10, 2012 at approximately 4:00AM, two young black males, believed to be in their late teenage years, robbed the Quick Check store located on Morris Avenue at gun point.

According to the victim’s who were working the late night shift, the male wearing the white t-shirt pulled out a silver revolver and ordered the store employees to the floor while the suspect wearing the striped shirt, bright blue sneakers, went behind the counter and removed the cashier draw which contained an undisclosed amount of money. The unidentified robbers then fled on foot, heading in the direction of Sayre Road.

Even though the robbers were caught on security footage, no one has yet come forward with their identity and the case remains unsolved.

Case: UN-12-03655

New Jersey Crime Stoppers is offering a reward of $5,000 for information leading to the arrest of these individuals. You can contact NJCS by calling 908-654-TIPS 8477

You are also urged to contact: Union County Police Department with any information. You can Submit a Web Tip on their website UCTIP and/or text them – Text “UCTIP along with your message” to 274637 (Crimes)

HERITAGE UPDATE – 01/29/13, YPSILANTI — Julia Niswender’s death ruled a homicide in final autopsy report, toxicology results inconclusive:

Julia_Niswender Campus Murder

The Ypsilanti Police Department has received the final autopsy report for Julia Niswender, which determined her death was a homicide.

Police have been investigating the Eastern Michigan University junior’s death as an apparent homicide, unless it could be proven otherwise, since she was found dead in her off-campus apartment on Dec. 11.

Toxicology test results that investigators were waiting for have also come back and have yielded no conclusive information, according to a press release Ypsilanti police sent out Tuesday.

Up to this point, few new details have become available since the autopsy in December determined there were no signs of trauma on Niswender’s body, but there were indicators of possible foul play.

“The Police Department recognizes and understands the public’s interest in this death investigation, and Ypsilanti police detectives, the Michigan State Police, and federal agencies continue to utilize all available tools and investigate all possible sources of information regarding this case,” according to the statement from Ypsilanti police.

Currently no suspects have been identified.

Police are again asking anyone with additional information or tips on this case to call Detective Sgt. Thomas Eberts at 734-482-9878 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-SPEAKUP.

Officers were dispatched at about 9:30 p.m. Dec. 11, 2012 to perform a welfare check on the student after her family and friends hadn’t heard from her in a couple days, according to the Ypsilanti Police Department. They located her body in her apartment at Peninsular Place apartments in the 1000 block of North Huron River Drive.

The repeating sound of an alarm clock and unanswered calls from her parents reportedly led to the request for police.

Click here for full article by Heritage

Unsolved Murder of Amy Lynn Drake (11/22/87 – 11/24/06)

Contributed photo
Amy Drake

Amy Drake went missing in late September, 2006 when she was 18-years-old. Her family filed a missing persons report with the Skowhegan Police Department.

Amy was a teenage girl who was born in Farmington, Maine on November 22, 1987. She lived in Skowhegan during her teen years and attended Jay and Skowhegan Schools where she was a cheerleader and good student. She was a good person and a typical, happy, kind teen so many were shocked and saddened when her murdered remains were discovered in the Fall of 2006.

According to reports, Amy went missing in late September, 2006. Her family noticed her purse and clothes were still at their home which indicates she planned to be back. They reported her disappearance to Skowhegan Police Department.

On November 24, 2006, two days after the missing teen’s 19th birthday, hunters found her murdered remains in a wooded area off River Road in Norridgewock, ME which is approximately two miles from Skowhegan.

Authorities didn’t release the cause of death but did say she was in fact, murdered.

”Manner of death is always an issue that we withhold. We feel it’s very important. That kind of information can make or break the case, and what we don’t want to do is put information out there that could take away the possibility of narrowing down our focus on individuals,” Lt. Gary Wright from the Maine State Police said to Portland Press Herald in 2009. 

During Amy’s funeral, the Rev. Mark Tanner of the Federated Church in Skowhegan asked her family and friends to be vigilant in finding her killer, and they have been.

”We all have a job to do,” Tanner said. ”We have a responsibility to one another. We have a responsibility to our young people, and to the ones around us – to keep our eyes open.” 

”The voices that God has given us are voices that allow us to speak. Some of the worst mistakes we can make as people are to keep our mouths closed.”

Who would have wanted her dead? Maine State Police have been trying to figure that question out for over six years as well. They say someone has information regarding this case that they haven’t reported and hope they do what’s morally right and give Amy Drake’s loved ones the closure they’ve been desperately hoping and praying for.

”We continue to follow-up on any lead that comes in on it. We’re still reviewing the evidence that we have collected in the last couple of years,” said Wright.

Amy Lynn Drake

Amy L. Drake – Photo of her gravestone provided by Amy Drake’s Find A Grave 

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to please contact: Maine State Police at (207) 624-7143 — You may also report information about this crime using the online Report a Crime form.

Source:
Maine State Police Website
Portland Press Herald
Find A Grave

lester_garnierLester Garneir (pictured) was a San Francisco police officer who was murdered 24 years ago by an unknown culprit.

On the evening of July 10, 1988 Lester was eating dinner with family in the Bay Area of Concord, California when he received a sudden phone call which cut the dinner short. After hanging up the phone, Lester left. This was the last time his family will see him alive.

Less than 24 hours after suddenly leaving his family’s home, Lester was found in Walnut Creek, only a couple of miles from his home, slumped over his stirring wheel in his 1984 Chevrolet Corvette. He had been shot in the head and chest.

His vehicle was parked across three parking spots in a manner that Lester’s law enforcement colleagues said was so that anyone approaching the car could be spotted.

The murder weapon, an AMT .380 semi-automatic, was never located.

Witnesses who were in Walnut Creek the night of the murder told authorities they saw two females leaving the crime scene area around the same time of the shooting. The first woman was described as a tall, thin blonde who cops now believe — thanks to advances in fingerprinting technology — was a Scottish immigrant named Catherine Kuntz.

catherine_kuntz

Kuntz moved to the United States from her home country of Scotland in 1985 after meeting a U.S. Navy Sailor.

The 44-year-old recently called a prison in Ocala, Florida, her “home.”

Kuntz is the prime suspect and police want her behind bars. They say that during the 1980’s Kuntz lived in apartments threw out Martinez, Concord, Walnut Creek and Alameda, CA. And often visited the Oakland area.

Three years after the murder of Lester, Kuntz was charged in Virginia for attempting a ‘murder for hire’ plot. She hired a teenager to murder her husband, Gregory Kuntz however, when Gregory survived he was able to aid police to the suspect shooter and although Catherine was cleared of the conspiracy charge, she did plead guilty to misdemeanor assault for her involvement in hiring the two young men to kill her husband.  For that, she was given credit for time served.

Kuntz served alot of time in prison for different crimes and although she’s been a long-time suspect in Lester’s murder police don’t have the evidence to charge her and Lester Garnier’s murder remains unsolved.

For additional information and photos on this case, please click: SFGATE – Unsolved Murder of a SF Cop

Most of the information was gathered from Lester’s case featured on America’s Most Wanted – There you will find additional information and anyone with information can submit a tip there as well.

A young couple vanishes after a frightening car crash in South Dakota, only to be discovered several months later only feet away from the crash site. But how did they get there?


Arnold Archambeau and Ruby Bruguier


Victims mysteriously disappear after their vehicle crashes into a ditch, only to show up feet away from ditch several months later.

On the morning of December 12, 1992, a car stopped at a remote intersection at the edge of the Yankton Sioux Indian Reservation in Lake Andes, South Dakota. It was cold and the road was icy.

The driver was 20-year-old Arnold Archambeau. One of the passengers was his girlfriend, 19-year-old Ruby Bruguier. The other passenger was Ruby’s cousin, 17-year-old Tracy Dion. All three had been drinking when the car crashed in a frozen ditch.

Tracy recalled what happened:

“We came up to that stop sign. That’s all I remember is just him looking and, saying there are no cars and him spinning out from the stop sign. And it was just like the snap of a finger and the next thing you know, we ended up in the ditch. I was upside down in the ditch and Ruby and I was in the car you know. Arnold wasn’t in the car. I don’t know where he was. Ruby was crying. She was saying oh my God, oh my God. She just kept hitting the car. The next thing I know, the door, it was open a little ways and she had enough room where she slid out. And then so I was going to reach over and then it was just like that, the door went shut.”


Ruby Bruguier

Arnold Archambeau

By the time help arrived, Tracy was the only person still in the car. For some unexplained reason, Arnold and Ruby had abandoned her.

By daybreak, the police had already searched the area. Although the ice underneath the car was frozen solid, they feared that Arnold and Ruby had wandered off and fallen through the ice at another location.

Bill Youngstrom was a Deputy for the Charles Mix County Sheriff’s Department at the time of their disappearance:

“We walked around the ice part. We had one officer walk on the opposite side of the railroad tracks, thinking maybe they wandered off toward the lake area, which was also frozen. I’ve been to a number of accidents where there hasn’t been somebody around. The driver hasn’t been there, no passengers there. And a lot of times it’s because they’ve been partying. Out drinking. I mean we do have a DWI law. That was initially my first thought. Maybe Arnold was out drinking and didn’t want to get arrested, so we figured he’d show up in a few days.”

Arnold’s aunt, Karen Tuttle, did not accept that theory:

“I knew he wouldn’t hide, he would’ve come home to us or called us and told us I’m over here don’t worry about me. But we never heard anything from him.”

Over the next three months, Deputy Youngstrom investigated every possible lead. Day after day he came up empty. Then the spring thaw arrived. In early March, a passing motorist saw a body in the ditch, just 75 feet from the accident site. It was Ruby Bruguier. Deputy Youngstrom witnessed a gruesome scene:

The bodies of Bruguier and Archambeau were discovered in a ditch several months later, but how did they get there?

“Her glasses were missing. Both shoes were missing. Her clothes were in tact. It appeared to be the same clothes that she had on the night of the accident. But the body was very decomposed. It was hard to recognize. And in fact we had to get down to look at a tattoo to get a positive identification of the body. At that time, our department decided that we would start pumping the ditch out. And about noon the next day we found the body of Arnold submerged in the water, about 15 feet away from where we found Ruby. Arnold’s body was very well kept. His skin color was fine. He was not frozen to the ground. The clothes were not frozen to the ground. There is a question mark as far as in our investigation if he was wearing the same clothes that he was the night of the accident.”

The bodies were immediately autopsied but there was no way to determine the time of death. The coroner concluded that Arnold and Ruby had both died of exposure. But Deputy Youngstrom suspected foul play:

“Death by exposure is like they froze to death. I cannot actually buy that. They may have froze to death. But they didn’t freeze to death at that ditch. It’s impossible that they could have been there the entire three months. I myself personally walked that ditch several times during that period. I’ve gotten written affidavits from people that’s also watched, walked it, people that have nothing to do with the case. They couldn’t have been there. They couldn’t have missed.”

Deputy Youngstrom was further baffled by the discovery of two items that seemed to support the theory that Arnold and Ruby had not died in the ditch:

“We found a tuft of hair alongside the road. This hair was later determined by the forensic laboratory to belong to Ruby Bruguier. That hair couldn’t have stayed there for three months. In my opinion, it was when whoever brought the bodies back to the ditch, that’s when that piece of hair fell off of Ruby. At the time we pulled Arnold’s body from the ditch, I found a set of keys in his pocket, the keys were a car or vehicle key. And what appeared to be two house keys. I still have these keys in my possession. And to this day I have not found the vehicle nor that house that these keys fit.”

Soon there was another startling revelation. A witness claimed to have seen Arnold, accompanied by three other people on New Year’s Eve, almost three weeks after he was reported missing. Authorities brought the witness in for a polygraph exam. She passed.

But how did the bodies of Arnold Archambeau and Ruby Bruguier end up in the very same ditch where they crashed their car three months earlier? Ruby’s father, Quentin Bruguier, had his own theory:

“They had to die someplace else. Somebody had to come and put them back in there again, to make it look like that’s where they died.”

Were Arnold Archambeau and Ruby Bruguier victims of foul play? How and why their bodies were discovered in a ditch 75 feet from the crash site remains a troubling mystery.

Source: Unsolved Mysteries (UM)

Gina CyphersGina Cyphers was murdered in Salina, Kansas, on December 28, 1995. She was 24 years old at the time of her death, and the mother of a baby boy. On the morning of December 28, 1995, Gina took her baby to the “Morning Out for Moms” child care at a local church. This was a routine she followed every Thursday morning. As always, she was to pick the young boy up at 11:30 a.m. When she failed to return at the appointed time, the church telephoned her live-in boyfriend at his place of employment. The boyfriend went home, only to find her murdered inside the trailer they shared.

Gina’s murder occurred more than seventeen years ago, and there has still been no arrest made.

 

 

Click Unsolved Crimes for additional crime-scene photos and contact information regarding this case. Clicking the link will also bring you to other unsolved homicides.


Composite Sketch created by National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Unidentified “Jane Doe”

Discovered on October 5, 1980 in Henderson, Clark County, Nevada
Estimated date of death is 24 hours prior to discovery

Vital Statistics:

Estimated age: 14 – 25 years old Race/Gender: Caucasian Female
Approximate Height and Weight: 5’2″; 103-110 lbs.
Distinguishing Characteristics: Light reddish, blonde or brown, shoulder length hair; green or hazel eyes. Nonsmoker.
Tattoos: A crudely made tattoo of letter “S” on inner portion of right forearm, approximately 1/2″ in length.
Dental Information: Available. Wisdom teeth impacted. She had fillings. Dental Features: 7 & 8 are present, diastema, 27 present root tip.
Clothing: No clothing located.
Fingerprints: Full prints are available in file. Prints sent to CA DOJ, FBI, and LVMPD – no matching record.
DNA: Available; University of North Texas.

Case History
The deceased homicide victim was located on October 15, 1980 on State Route 146 near Arroyo Grande Road, Henderson, NV.

Her fingerprints matched no one in the missing person system at the time.
The victim was murdered elsewhere, her body dumped at the site. Multiple head wounds, possibly with a hammer, to back of skull and behind right ear. Seven puncture-type stab wounds to left, upper portion of back, approximately 3″ in depth.

If you have any information about this case please contact:
Henderson Police Department
Detective John Williams
702-565-2004

Clark County Coroner Office
702-455-3210
You may remain anonymous when submitting information.

Agency Case Number:
80-01221

NCIC Number:
U-898928671
Please refer to this number when contacting any agency with information regarding this case.

Source Information:
Eyewitness News
The Doe Network