Posts Tagged ‘Missing Children Found Murdered’

 

regina_mae_armstrong

Regina Mae Armstrong

Age: 6
Sex: Female
Race: Caucasian
Missing Since:
Body Found: 06/18/85
Location: Oviedo, Orlando, Florida
Zip Code: 32762
Possible Suspect: Unknown

On the afternoon of June 18, 1985, Regina Armstrong, then 6, was playing with her 9-year-old sister and their babysitter’s chid outside their babysitter’s  Semoran Terrace apartment complex on south Semoran Boulevard in Orlando, FL, when she was kidnapped.

Armstrong_Suspect_CompositeAfter police were alerted, a massive search for Regina was immediately conducted. The little girl’s sister gave police a description of the kidnapper and police were able to have a composite sketch drawn.

The sketch depicts what the abducted may have looked like in the 80’s. He was described as a man in his 40’s  who wore a plaid shirt and old blue jeans. He had a cut on his lip and stubble on his face. He talked to the three children briefly and then left, but reappeared about 30 minutes later as the children play near the apartment mailboxes.

The man lured Regina Mae to follow him, most likely under false pretenses, and promised the other two children that he would pay them each $2 to watch a door at the nearby Beau Barton apartments where he said he and his wife lived.

 

According to Regina’s sister, the abductor had a broken lip and had an odor to him.

“He smelled oily, like he worked for a mechanic or on cars, he didn’t smell like a normal guy.” recalled Christina Worsham, Regina’s sister,  during an 2010 interview.

When Christina realized her sister wasn’t coming back, she tried to warn their baby sitter. But the woman, for some reason, wouldn’t listen to Christina’s pleas and instead locked the door. It wasn’t until nearly two hours later when the baby sitter’s boyfriend and another brother returned, that Christina finally got help.

“I was so scared. I didn’t know what to do or who to call,” Worsham said. “I was just shaken. I didn’t know if I was going to be in trouble or what was going to happen.”

Police were finally notified at 4:30 p.m. when Donna Armstrong returned to pick up her daughters.

“It was unreal. I just didn’t have any idea what was going on,” Donna Armstrong said. “It’s a day I’ll never forget.”

Many hoped for a safe return but sadly, a little over two years after the abduction a construction worker found the skull and weathered, dirty sundress Regina was last seen wearing, in a Oviedo housing development approximately 15 miles from where she was kidnapped.

The findings matched that of Regina Armstrong and what became a hopeful rescue turned into a manhunt for her killer. However, almost 28 years later and the person responsible remains unknown and Regina’s murder remains unsolved.

“The key to solving this case is finding somebody who knows something,” Detective Michael Moreschi from the Orlando Police Department said to reporters. “Either that, or [DNA] technology will finally have caught up with the crime.”

Anyone with information regarding this cold case is urged to please contact: Florida’s Crimeline – 1-800-423-8477.

Cold case: Donna Willing was sent to the store to fetch bread when she was killed

Pictured: Donna Willing was nine years old in 1970 when she was raped and murdered after being sent to the store to pick-up bread in a Wisconsin town

11/18/12 MILWAUKEE, WI — Virginia Davis describes says the pain left behind by her 9-year-old sister’s 1970 rape and strangulation as being like “a million holes.”

Only 4 years old at the time, Davis knew little about the crime. The subject remained off-limits for the next four decades for many in a family that hoped to forget the hurt. But Davis couldn’t forget, and after years seeking help to solve her sister’s killing, she’s preparing to face the man police believe is responsible.

On Monday, prosecutors will argue that a childhood neighbor and convicted sex offender – who they say confessed to the killing but has since recanted – should go to trial in the death of Donna Willing. With physical evidence in the case lost or destroyed, prosecutors say the will argue under the state’s sex offender law that Robert Hill, 73, is a sexually violent person and must remain in custody indefinitely.

Davis says that when she was a child, her sisters would scold her for talking about Donna, warning, “You don’t want to make mom cry, do you?” Most of the siblings don’t discuss it even now.

Horror: Donna Willing was just blocks from home when she was raped and murdered in 1970

Pictured above: Donna shortly before her murder, stands in-front of her home with a hula-hoop around her

Unsolved: Virginia Davis, right, has spent her life helping to track down the man who strangled her sister, center

UNSOLVED: Virginia Davis, right, has spent her life helping to track down the man who strangled her sister, center

But Davis needed answers. At 15 she found the courage to go to the library and read news coverage about her sister’s death. Every detail discovered since has helped.

“I didn’t feel like so lonely, I didn’t feel so empty, I didn’t feel like I had a million holes anymore,” said Davis, now a mother of three who lives in suburban Milwaukee. “I just started feeling like it’s easier, it’s easier, it’s easier now. I can talk about her now. I can speak her name.”

Davis clearly remembers the afternoon of Feb. 26, 1970. Her big sister Donna was reading to her from a favorite book about animals as they sat on the couch. Her mother wanted Donna to go to the bakery for bread, but Virginia purposely delayed the trip, begging for one more story.

“I remember seeing out the window, it was getting dark and thinking `Mom won’t make her go if it gets dark. She’ll send (my brother) or somebody else. She can’t go,'” Davis recalls. “We were afraid of the boogeyman and stuff back then. The boogeyman will get her if she goes out after dark.”

Donna walked out at 5:15 p.m. A witness later saw her get into a green car. Less than two hours later, a man discovered her bruised and bloodied body under a car in his garage about a mile away.

Newspaper reports at the time said police had people of interest, but no leads panned out.

In 2004, Virginia Davis saw a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel story about police arresting an 83-year-old man for a 1958 murder based on DNA evidence. She called the reporter for help getting police to take another look at her sister’s case.

A cold case unit that formed in 2007 did, and soon focused on Hill. He had lived next door with his wife and five children and Davis said she remembered playing with his son. She also remembered his wife, who always yelled, but not him.

Prosecutors soon discovered physical evidence in Donna Willing’s case had been lost during a flood or when detectives cleaned out the evidence room in the 1990s, according to police Lt. Keith Balash. So investigators in 2008 began interviewing Hill in prison – where he was serving a 10-year sentence for sexually assaulting four children under the age of 10 between 1995 and 2002.

Hill first told police he sexually assaulted Donna after she got into his car that night, according to court documents. She began to squirm and slapped him. He became angry, afraid she would tell on him. He strangled her and dumped her in a garage. It all took about 10 minutes, he said.

In another account outlined in court documents, Hill said he molested Donna for years, picked her up and had sex with her. After she screamed, he put his hand over her mouth and strangled her.

Hill, who is now being in held a supervised facility, has since recanted both statements. Balash said Hill knew specifics of Donna’s injuries that hadn’t been released.

Hill’s attorney, Robert Prifogle, didn’t return a phone call seeking comment before Monday’s hearing.

Before her mother died in 2009, Davis finally asked why she needed Donna to go to the bakery. Her mother said she wanted to make French toast for dinner. That filled a big hole. This year, Davis met the man who discovered his sister’s body – another big hole filled. She said she had blamed herself when she was younger for delaying her sister’s trip until after dark, but no more.

Davis chokes up when talking about her gratitude for the cold case detectives who pursued the case.

“I want to invent or create a word and I can’t come up with anything yet that is the equivalent to how I feel,” she said.

Source: Huffingtonpost

Seven year old Michelle Norris was found murdered on May 30, 1988 on a wooded hill behind Brook Street. The little girl had disappeared 4 days earlier outside a local Schoolyard (Captain G. Harold Hunt Elementary School) in Central Falls. Her bruised body had been beaten, raped and then suffocated to death.

Authorities classified Michelle’s death as a murder, bringing to five the number of young children who have died in the Providence area recently after being reported missing.

Sadly Michelle was not the only young Rhode Island girl to be a victim of homicide that year.

It was a cold winter day, January 6th, 1988, when Ten year old Christine Cole of Pawtucket made her way down the road to head to the local supermarket to get milk for her Mother. She had just turned 10 years old two days prior, being in the double digits, she wanted to be more independant. That was the last time anyone say the little girl alive. on February 28th, 1988 Christina was found murdered on the beach at Conimicut Point in Warwick, RI. Her body washed ashore.

The medical examiner who performed an autopsy on the body said that she would not rule the death a homicide unless police provide her with evidence indicating foul play. However, authorities suspect foul play as she was one of five children to be murdered in a five month span in Rhode Island.

If you have any information about these two cases please call the Rhode Island State Police at (401) 721-2622 or (401) 721-2618. – Or go to