Posts Tagged ‘Teenager’

Two suspects still wanted for the armed robbery of a store in Union, New Jersey during the Summer.

quick_check_robbery

They were described as being two black males, believed to be in their late teens, both with a thin (med) build, standing approximately 6`0″ tall. If the still-shots are two small for viewing then please click here to view a larger set.

In the early morning hours of July 10, 2012 at approximately 4:00AM, two young black males, believed to be in their late teenage years, robbed the Quick Check store located on Morris Avenue at gun point.

According to the victim’s who were working the late night shift, the male wearing the white t-shirt pulled out a silver revolver and ordered the store employees to the floor while the suspect wearing the striped shirt, bright blue sneakers, went behind the counter and removed the cashier draw which contained an undisclosed amount of money. The unidentified robbers then fled on foot, heading in the direction of Sayre Road.

Even though the robbers were caught on security footage, no one has yet come forward with their identity and the case remains unsolved.

Case: UN-12-03655

New Jersey Crime Stoppers is offering a reward of $5,000 for information leading to the arrest of these individuals. You can contact NJCS by calling 908-654-TIPS 8477

You are also urged to contact: Union County Police Department with any information. You can Submit a Web Tip on their website UCTIP and/or text them – Text “UCTIP along with your message” to 274637 (Crimes)

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Unsolved Murder of Amy Lynn Drake (11/22/87 – 11/24/06)

Contributed photo
Amy Drake

Amy Drake went missing in late September, 2006 when she was 18-years-old. Her family filed a missing persons report with the Skowhegan Police Department.

Amy was a teenage girl who was born in Farmington, Maine on November 22, 1987. She lived in Skowhegan during her teen years and attended Jay and Skowhegan Schools where she was a cheerleader and good student. She was a good person and a typical, happy, kind teen so many were shocked and saddened when her murdered remains were discovered in the Fall of 2006.

According to reports, Amy went missing in late September, 2006. Her family noticed her purse and clothes were still at their home which indicates she planned to be back. They reported her disappearance to Skowhegan Police Department.

On November 24, 2006, two days after the missing teen’s 19th birthday, hunters found her murdered remains in a wooded area off River Road in Norridgewock, ME which is approximately two miles from Skowhegan.

Authorities didn’t release the cause of death but did say she was in fact, murdered.

”Manner of death is always an issue that we withhold. We feel it’s very important. That kind of information can make or break the case, and what we don’t want to do is put information out there that could take away the possibility of narrowing down our focus on individuals,” Lt. Gary Wright from the Maine State Police said to Portland Press Herald in 2009. 

During Amy’s funeral, the Rev. Mark Tanner of the Federated Church in Skowhegan asked her family and friends to be vigilant in finding her killer, and they have been.

”We all have a job to do,” Tanner said. ”We have a responsibility to one another. We have a responsibility to our young people, and to the ones around us – to keep our eyes open.” 

”The voices that God has given us are voices that allow us to speak. Some of the worst mistakes we can make as people are to keep our mouths closed.”

Who would have wanted her dead? Maine State Police have been trying to figure that question out for over six years as well. They say someone has information regarding this case that they haven’t reported and hope they do what’s morally right and give Amy Drake’s loved ones the closure they’ve been desperately hoping and praying for.

”We continue to follow-up on any lead that comes in on it. We’re still reviewing the evidence that we have collected in the last couple of years,” said Wright.

Amy Lynn Drake

Amy L. Drake – Photo of her gravestone provided by Amy Drake’s Find A Grave 

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to please contact: Maine State Police at (207) 624-7143 — You may also report information about this crime using the online Report a Crime form.

Source:
Maine State Police Website
Portland Press Herald
Find A Grave

 

Laralee Spear, 15

Date Found: 04/25/94 (according to Deland County Police website. Although some reports say 04/26/94)

Location Found: Deerfoot Road, Deland, Florida

Laralee Spear was a fifteen year old freshman who attended Deland High School. She was described as an A-student who had many friends and was part of the cheerleading squad. Laralee enjoyed riding her bike, sing in her church choir, and playing her violin. She loved animals, especially horses and hoped to become a pediatrician. Sadly she would never have a chance to fulfill her career dream.

On the morning of April 25, 1994, Laralee had woken up early to get ready and go to school. School rang out at 3:15pm and she took the bus to get home. The bus stopped on South Spring Garden Avenue, which was only a few blocks from Laralee’s home. The teen had her own route which included walking by Deerfoot Road. She promptly disappeared somewhere between the bus-stop and her home and it didn’t take Barbara Spear, Laralee’s mother, long to call Deland Police Department and report her daughter missing. Mothers Instinct told her something was not right. She knew her daughter and knew she would never run away.

Ninety minutes after calling police, her body was spotted by a police helicopter in a secluded area behind an abandoned house on Deerfoot Road. She had been murdered by multiple gunshots.

It wasn’t the first time this vacant house was a crime-scene. About one year prior, the house had been burned down and many believe the unknown killer was familiar with the area. Laralee’s walking route was right by Deerfoot Road and it’s possible she was picked at random. It’s also possible that the killer knew her or seen the teen and knew her walking route.

The area has had a history of complaints. Cops have been called to this house before. Teenagers often use the place for drug parties, neighbors say. There’s an old railroad trestle nearby.

Several witnesses from the neighborhood informed cops that they saw a black low-rider truck speeding away from the area at about the time the girl disappeared.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Crime Stoppers of Northeast Florida at (888) 277-TIPS.

Wendy Kathleen Hudakoc

Age-progression photo of what Wendy might look like at twenty-five

Wendy Hudakoc was last seen leaving a party with an adult male on 11/15/1998 in the city of Naples.

  • Missing Since: November 15, 1998 from Naples, Florida
  • Classification: Endangered Missing
  • Date Of Birth: August 12, 1984
  • Age: 14
  • Height: 5’6″
  • Weight:130 lbs.
  • Hair Color: Brown
  • Eye Color: Hazel
  • Race: White
  • Gender: Female

Fourteen year old Wendy Hudakoc believed that nothing really bad ever happened to her or her family.

Her stepfather, Dan Campbell, said the lack of concern about the dangers of the world, common in younger people, may have played a role in the pre-teen sneaking out of her home on Nov. 14th, 1998, to attend a party.

She never came back and hasn’t been seen or heard from since.

“When kids sneak out to go to a party, the worst thing they think is going to happen is they’re going to get caught and grounded by their parents or caught by the police,” Campbell said. “They don’t think they’ll never return home.”

Almost 14 years since her disappearance, Wendy is one of two dozen children missing from Lee and Collier counties, according to the Florida Law Enforcement. Many of those are suspected runaways, a few are suspected parental abductions and the rest are categorized as “endangered.”

National Missing Children’s Day; A day set aside every year to celebrate the missing children who have been returned home, and to remember those who have not. Nearly 800,000 children are reported missing every year in the United States, an average of over 2,000 a day, according to U.S. Department of Justice statistics.

Most are recovered, many after only a few hours and or only (approximately) 100 or so, are abducted or murdered by a stranger or vague acquaintance each year in the US.

“As a parent, you just have to be vigilant and take precautions, take certain measures to prevent something from happening to your children,” said Amelia Vasquez, the program director for the National Center’s Collier branch. “Parents just need to be prepared.”

Sgt. Stefan Loeffler from the Sheriff’s Office’s Special Crimes Bureau said his unit needs to remain optimistic that the children they’re looking for can be recovered and reunited with their families. He said they never give up.

“We keep on investigating the cases until we find that person,” Loeffler said. “We continually investigate, try to generate new leads.”

Included on the list of missing children in Lee and Collier counties are 6-year-old Adji Desir, who disappeared from outside his grandmother’s Immokalee home in January, and “Baby” Bryan Dos Santos-Gomez, who was abducted from his mother at knife point on Dec. 1, 2006.

Pictured;  Adji Desir (6) abducted in FL at knifepoint in 2006

Those cases made headlines, but several other children on the list did not, including 16-year-old Carmen Bautista, who authorities believe ran away from Immokalee in June 2008 with her then-2-year-old daughter Jemni Bautista, and baby Ana Maria Jimenez-Bautista. Authorities do not have photographs of any of the Bautista children, which makes finding them all the more difficult.

Herb Jones, vice president for external affairs and Internet safety for the National Center, said one in six missing children is ultimately found in part because of a photograph. He said parents cannot take their children’s safety for granted, no matter where they live.

“It can happen to anyone at any time. Small cities, big cities, medium-sized cities,” Jones said.

Authorities say the most important thing parents can do to keep their children safe is to communicate with them.

Campbell said parents should get to know their children’s friends, including their full names and a little backround information. Always ask where they’re going and to keep in touch.

The last person Wendy Hudakoc was known to be with was Ronald DePeppo, then 20, who she had met at a bowling alley. They left the party together around 2:30 a.m. on Nov. 15. DePeppo said he dropped Wendy off at home.

Campbell said he and his wife, Shelley, are not optimistic Wendy will one day walk back through their door. They’ve resigned themselves to knowing she is gone.

Both Dan and Shelley Campbell are now active in with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Missing and Endangered Person Information Clearinghouse.

“We still talk about Wendy on a normal basis. It’s not taboo. We still have pictures of her up,” Dan Campbell said. “It never goes away.”

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Rachael Garden.. Missing 3/22/80.. Newton, New Hampshire    Peter J. Henderson, Jr.

Rachael Garden (15) missing from Newton, New Hampshire since March 22nd, 1980

Age-progression of what Rachael might look like at age 42 (she would be 48 years old as of 2012.)

Rachael Garden is listed as ”Non-Family-Abduction”

Date of birth: 12/30/64 – Date of disappearance: March 22nd, 1980 Description: Caucasian female with light brown hair, hazel eyes, 5’1”, weighing approximately 100-pounds in 1980. She also had her ears peirced and although she wore dental retainers, she wasn’t wearing it at the time of her disappearance.

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NEWTON, NH When the opened around 9:15pm at Rowe’s Corner Market store on March 22nd, 1980, owner Peter Jewett was delighted to see one of his favorite customers, a slender teenage girl named Rachael Garden, step into the quiet store.

Unlike many of the sullen teenagers who patronized the store, 15-year-old Rachel was memorable for her outgoing personality and ready smile; the type of kid who always took the time to say a friendly “Hi.”

Rachael handed Jewett a five dollar bill for a pack of cigarettes and headed out the door to walk to a friend’s house in the 50 block of north Main Street. Twenty-seven years later, Jewett, who now owns a general store in East Kingston, still remembers his last glimpse of Rachael. “I turned and leaned against the counter like I always did to look at the road and I saw Rachael walking toward Maple Avenue,” he said.

Sometime that Saturday night Rachael, a petite ninth-grader at Sanborn Regional High School, disappeared from the streets of Newton, and was never seen again.

For most Newton residents the next morning was just an ordinary Sunday in March. There was a lingering chill of winter in the air and the ground was damp from recent rains and winter’s melting snows. Jimmy Carter was president and Pink Floyd’s “Another Brick in the Wall” was on top of the music charts.

With a population barely over 3,000 people, Newton had only one full-time police officer. It was the kind of town where bad things just didn’t happen.

Rachael’s parents called the police station at about 10 a.m. on Sunday to report their oldest child missing. Rachael’s mother, who has since moved away and expresses reluctance to talk about the case, says only that she knew right away something was seriously wrong when Rachael did not return to the family’s small cape on Main Street.

What the police did and who they talked to in those first 24 hours Rachael disappeared is known only to them. But by Monday morning, Rachael was still missing.

Vic Daley, a vice principal at the high school, remembers taking a call from Rachael’s mother the Monday after she disappeared. “She only said that Rachael would be absent. I didn’t know that something was wrong till maybe a few days later.” Daley says he doesn’t remember if the police ever came to the school. “I don’t think so, but it’s possible.”

That Rachael was considered a runaway in those first few months seems evident from the lack of publicity her disappearance generated. There were no posters or fliers. No announcements were made at school. Friends were not questioned until months or even years later. At school,  her desk sat empty and no one really asked why.

There were reasons to believe Rachael might have left home on her own accord. She was a teenager after all; a girl who adored her siblings but sometimes resented having to baby-sit for them so often. A girl who complained to friends about feeling stifled by her parents’ rules. She was drawn to the more rebellious of her peers, the kind who skipped school or smoked and drank in the woods near Martin’s Pond.

In her free time, Rachael often walked the quarter-mile down to Rowe’s Corner Market, looking for some excitement. Sometimes she went to the hill across from Maple Avenue, a place where local teens often congregated.

One friend recalls that Rachael even talked of running away around the time she disappeared.

And then there were the alleged sightings in the months that followed her disappearance, sightings that spurred Rachael’s mother to rush down to Haverhill, Mass. or over to Hampton Beach looking for clues.

But others say Rachael would not leave her family or town voluntarily. “She was too young and naïve to do something like that,” said one friend.

The day she disappeared, Rachael was reportedly wearing a two-tone blue ski parka, jeans and a plaid shirt with silver threads. She had on brown lace-up shoes and carried a dark blue tote bag with the word “Things” imprinted on one side. Police believe Rachael left all of her belongings at home, including her dental retainer. She reportedly had a horse she loved and would never have left unattended.

While police questioned witnesses and followed leads, time passed. Summer came and went, but still there was no sign of Rachael.

As 1980 came to a close, it seemed that Rachael was already forgotten by many in town. Her classmates, now in their sophomore year, assumed she had dropped out or moved away.

Life in town went on as usual. At the close of 1980, the police of chief wrote a summary of his department’s year in the town report. Two arrests for littering were noted. A police cruiser was stolen and there was a burglary at the Rolla Round Skating Rink. Over the course of the year, the police station received 11 reports of missing persons. Who went missing and whether they were ever found is not recorded. — There is no mention of Rachael Garden.

(more…)

→ After watching part 1, click the video screen which will take you to part 2

Police say an eighth grader found dying on a roadway was a hit-and-run victim, but his parents believe he was murdered.

On June 4th, 1989, in Spokane, Washington, two friends on their way home were startled when their headlights revealed a body stretched out in the road. Thirteen year-old Russell Evans had apparently been struck by a car. He was barely alive, calling out for someone named Brian. Russell was admitted to Sacred Heart Hospital at 1:30 AM. Doctors struggled through the night to save his life as his parents stood by. The emergency team worked frantically, but by morning, Russell Evans was dead.

Russell was an active and popular 8th grader at Libby Middle School in Spokane. By the age of 13, he was already 6’3” tall. Aaron Abrhamson was one of his best friends:

“We did everything together. He was at my house every day and he was very well-liked. He had a good sense of humor. And he got along with pretty much everybody… he had no problems.”

On the night of June 3rd, in the hours before Russell died, he was with Aaron and other friends hanging out at a local park. It was a typical summer evening, until they were approached by two other teenagers. It escalated into an argument over Aaron’s girlfriend. Aaron said he was threatened and that Russell came to his defense:

“One of the teenagers said, ‘You’d better watch out, because maybe I’ll send my homeboys on you.’ But I didn’t really think much of it. So I just turned around and we left, and he got in his car with his friend and took off.”

After leaving the park, Russell spent the rest of the evening at a friend’s house. Then, at about 12:30 AM, he called his father to say that he was heading home.

Based on evidence found at the scene, police constructed a hit-and-run scenario. Spokane Police Lt. James Hill: ”On impact with the vehicle, he was separated from his shoes. He finally came to rest about seventy-five feet from where we think he was struck.”

Forensic pathologist George Lindholm concluded that Russell was likely struck in the back by a bumper. However, his father, John Evans, had a different opinion:

“We looked at him after he died and I thought he had been in a fight. Later on, when the police started talking about hit-and-run, his mom and I just couldn’t buy that. The injuries weren’t there.”

John and Sue Evans obtained copies of the official police report, complete with photographs. They noted that Russell’s shoes didn’t have their laces; they had been torn out. To Russell’s parents, it seemed like an important clue. The Evans’ returned to the scene of the accident with Sandy Ferris, the woman who had found Russell. Something didn’t feel right to Russell’s father:

“There was blood on the shoelace. Now tell me, how do you get blood on the shoelace if you’re struck and driven out of your shoes and thrown fifty feet down the hill?”

John and Sue became convinced that their son had been struck by something other than a hit-and-run driver, and they hired their own pathologist to investigate. While he did conclude that Russell had been hit by a car, the pathologist also told John that he found evidence of a struggle:

“This pathologist came back to us with the findings that Russell had been in a physical altercation prior to his death. If a body flies through the air, when that body hits the pavement, there would be some massive scraping. Russell did not have this.”

Based on their research, Russell’s father reconstructed his son’s final moments:

“I think it was a fight, going back up the hill. According to his hands, he got his licks in. He had finger bruises on his face and the side of the nose. Finger bruising on his upper arms, as though he were being held.”

Due to the allegations, the boys involved in the altercation with Russell and Aaron were given polygraph tests. They all passed.

Sandy Ferris, the woman who found Russell at the scene, claimed Russell was calling out to someone for help that night:

“When I first got there, the first thing I asked him was what happened. And he started calling for Brian. He said it more like the person was in listening in the distance, that his friend should have been there. After the police had gotten there, and they had started to put Russell in the ambulance, we saw a boy in white shorts up in the bushes and he was running up the hill. I tried to tell the policeman this a couple of times, but he kept telling me to get on the sidewalk. I thought maybe that could have been Brian.”

John Evans knew a friend of Russell’s named Brian and asked him if he knew anything:

“I asked Brian what he was wearing that night, and he said ‘Well, I was wearing white shorts and white t-shirt. But I was nowhere around.’ Then, later down the line, when the police questioned him, he denied owning that kind of outfit.”

Police speculate that the man Sandy saw running off was simply a curious citizen that heard the commotion and went out to take a look. But when Sue Evans arrived at the hospital that night, someone named Brian had just called the emergency ward to ask about Russell. She finds this more than suspicious:

“Who would have known about this? Unless somebody named Brian was at that scene, who he was calling for.”

Russell’s father John remains suspicious about the events of that night:

“There may be one or two people that know more than they’re telling, and the reason they’re probably not telling is that they are afraid for their lives.”

Evidence from the scene fully convinced Russell’s parents that he had been attacked and murdered, while police still believe Russell was the victim of a hit-and-run. However, officially, the case remains unsolved.

On the evening of October 13, 2002, 16 year old teenager Devyn Jude Murphy was stabbed to death in a house party in Wareham, Massachusetts. There was an altercation at the party which was attended by around 50 people, yet no one has come forward with any information. According to family members, Murphy had aspirations of becoming a chiropractor. It is believed that there are several people that may know who killed the teen, but either are afraid or refuse to come forward. If you have any information about who murdered Devyn Jude Murphy please contact the Massachusetts State Police at (508) 759-4488. All calls can be confidential.

Source: ctcoldcases.com

 

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♦ Article Published 10/14/08 – Source Below ♦

→ 52-year-old Anne Murphy of Onset never got to say goodbye to her son. Five years ago the Sandwich High School student went to a party and never came home.

MURPHY: My son Devyn Murphy was killed; he was 16 years old. He was 45 days into his 16th year, and he went to a party and he was stabbed. Every belief that you ever had about God or anything, it changes. There is before and after — before your child’s death and after your child’s death and family member. And you are not the same person.

Murphy doesn’t remember much of the first year after Devyn was murdered. She is mother to two other children, and she was left afraid, she said, walking around like a zombie with only her son’s death and her own guilt filling her head and sickening her stomach.

MURPHY: The first year is a real blur. At first you are thinking, my child is at camp. My child is on vacation. And then the reality starts to set in. The pain, it’s like being on fire from the inside out. And it doesn’t stop. It’s a descent to hell.

And murder, Murphy says, comes with a stigma. Several family members of murder victims interviewed for this story all say the same thing: when they talk about the murder, people seen to automatically place at least some of the blame for the crime on the victim, assuming they were in a gang or were involved in something underhanded or illegal that contributed to their death.

MURPHY: There is a feeling that the victim that was killed might have done something to get themselves killed. And there is a stigma to murder, people don’t want to talk about murder. Uh, you feel stigmatized — my child was the one who was murdered. And people feel, “Oh, they must be in a gang or they must have done something wrong that this would happen to them. Surely there must be some dark secret or some dark side of these people that this would come into their lives.”

48-year-old Bill Belanger sits across from Murphy as she speaks about her son’s death and he nods along.

BELANGER: Listening to Anne, it’s incredible, because if I were to follow her I would have said, “Ditto.” I mean, Ditto. Bravo, Anne.

Belanger is part of a Parents of Murdered Children support group in southern New Hampshire. He’s a big guy, large in stature and imposing. But he’s obviously broken by grief. He came to Cape Cod to support Murphy and the members of the POMC chapter here. Belanger and his wife Gina lost their daughter Erin to a murderer in Florida four years ago. She was 22, and their only child.

BELANGER: I remember at my first meeting asking people like, “Do you people want to take the ones who killed your son or daughter and strangle them to death”? And they are like, “Oh, yeah.” These people understand. All the hatred and the grief, they understand it. To me, it is my opium.

Bellanger is filled with anger, guilt and regret, he says. His daughter Erin wanted to escape the cold New England winters, so Belanger says he encouraged her to move to Florida and live near her grandmother there. She had a job, was renting a house and starting her life as a young adult.

BELANGER: It was a mass murder. Everyone in that house was killed. They were beaten with baseball bats and knives. I couldn;t give her an open casket. I had to cremate her because the damage was so bad, it was just horrible.

For Belanger, the POMC group has been a life-saver. It gives him an outlet to channel his grief and anger and advocate against the injustice he sees surrounding the issue of murder. He hates for the meetings to end, he says, and he feels safe spending time with people who understand his pain and want to prevent other parents from experiencing a similar loss.

BELANGER: When we get together and have our meetings, we hug each other. We give each other a hankie, but we are doing this so we don’t have to hug you one day. We are doing this so we don’t have to hug you one day. We don’t want to do that. And I think everyone here can agree to that. We don’t want to give you a hug one day. So that is why I do it.

David Flood of Ipswich is involved with the same POMC chapter as Belanger. He says that in addition to offering comfort and support, the group also helps victims find a way to channel their emotions into advocacy. But still, no one, they say, even the politicians don’t want to talk about murder.

FLOOD: Clearly something is broken and we don’t know how to fix it yet.

  Before meeting for an interview, Flood and Belanger say they both experienced a typical response while chatting over a cup of coffee in Woods Hole.

FLOOD: The tendency is to turn off when you hear Parents of Murdered Children. Like, we were down at this restaurant, nice sunny day, tourists all around. We started talking about it, and then we mentioned the group: Parents of Murdered Children. And there wasn’t a French fry crunched on that property for five minutes after we said Parents of Murdered Children. Who wants to talk about that on a nice day? Really weird.

While the pain and emotion associated with their losses may be similar, every murder is different, with varying circumstances and judicial outcomes. Four men were charged in Erin’s death, Belanger says, and the man who actually killed her is awaiting the death penalty. In Anne Murphy’s case, police think they know who did it, but no one has ever been charged with killing Devyn. Murphy says the lack of prosecution is just another senseless, inexplicable twist in the story of her son’s untimely death.  But both Murphy and Belanger say they’ve reached the point in their grief where they want to affect change. They want to honor their children’s lives and work until no other parents suffer the way they have.

SOURCE: http://www.wgbh.org/cainan/article/?item_id=4157829